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Ellieben

Tenant asking if name of her au pair can be added

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I have a tenant who has lived at my property with her child for six months and has requested a new rental agreement. She has been a good tenant, paying her rent on time and the property has been looked after.

The letting agency have advised that she currently has a male au pair staying at the property on a regular basis and would like his name to be added as being allowed to stay with her child.

I have contacted my Insurers who rightly advise that they would not be able to include him under the policy as he is her employee and not mine. They also state that they have never had such a request.

Letting agents do not have a problem with this but I am not too happy.

Any advice would be appreciated.

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Advice? Don't do it. Why not?

  1. An au pair is an unmarried young adult aged 18 to 30 years, who has no children and travels to a foreign country for a defined period of time to live with a host family. The au pair is considered as a full member of the family during the entire stay.
  2. This Lady tenant of yours is obviously going to have more of a serious relationship than the meaning of an Au Pair.Think about it why would anyone want an Au Pair on their tenancy agreement? Doesn't make any sense unless there is ulterior motive that is not being disclosed to you.
  3. Just say no you are not prepared to have this arrangement and leave it that. Her male Au Pair can still visit as many times as she likes can't he.?

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If he becomes a T he is then equally liable for any later claim so there could be advantage.

As an "Au Pair" I assume he is an immigrant so if he returns to where ever recovery becomes unlikely anyway.

He is going to be there whatever you allow for contractually at least by taking an application and proceessing it you have more awareness of him, but any credit check is likely to be useless.

The only greater risk I see to you is if / when the realtionship fails she departs and he takes up the occupancy alone, if that is likely?? He would then be free to abuse and you are unlikely to acheive recompense.

My thoughts are to take an application but politely refuse later as the credit check couldn't be carried out to your rent guarantee insurance companies satisfaction. Point out that his activities are within her control and not yours, there is nothing you can or would do should he stay.

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I'll add this to my list of excluded applicants along with...

Shift workers

Unemployed or part time workers.

Students

Smokers

Pet owners

Those in receipt of housing benefit or LHA

Company let's

Anybody resulting in overcrowding

Anyone running a business or commercial operation from property.

Anyone with long lead times for moving in.

Aged under 25

Poor or no references

Lettings for less than 6 months

Anyone with children.

Same sex couples

Anyone from the outside Europe or USA

Anyone requesting something out of my comfort zone.

Any foreigner who requires a Visa and can't produce one.

And as the Scots have seriously annoyed me over the election I'm thinking of refusing anyone from Scotland.

......

And before anyone asks, no, I don't have any trouble finding suitable tenants. The UK is full of people that tick all the boxes. There is no need to cut corners and pick someone who may be a problem for you.

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And before anyone asks, no, I don't have any trouble finding suitable tenants. The UK is full of people that tick all the boxes. There is no need to cut corners and pick someone who may be a problem for you.

Yes and no.

A lot depends on the area you are in. If your property is in a run down high unemployment area you are unlikely to get quality professional tenants but that is of course reflexed in the price to pay for the property and you cant complain too much if it occasionally goes pear shaped.

I'm based on a costal village so there are not so many "ideal" tenants about with a large enough disposable income and can afford £900 pcm for a 3 bed property so we cover both ends of the spectrum (professional and HB). The higher end properties (£1800+ pcm) do sometimes hang around a while before a tenant is found.

My personal choice for a property is one that is suitable for both HB and working tenants with the HB rate similar/same to the achievable rate to cover both bases. I then get the max amount of interest in the shortest time and short void periods. If I was in a area with a higher population and closer the city my criteria would likely to differ.

A couple of my L/L's also have a few properties out of my area (Manchester, Liverpool etc) which I don't manage and I am always hearing tales of woe about. Never buy out of your area unless you know it well is advice.

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I'll add this to my list of excluded applicants along with...

Shift workers

Unemployed or part time workers.

Students

Smokers

Pet owners

Those in receipt of housing benefit or LHA

Company let's

Anybody resulting in overcrowding

Anyone running a business or commercial operation from property.

Anyone with long lead times for moving in.

Aged under 25

Poor or no references

Lettings for less than 6 months

Anyone with children.

Same sex couples

Anyone from the outside Europe or USA

Anyone requesting something out of my comfort zone.

Any foreigner who requires a Visa and can't produce one.

And as the Scots have seriously annoyed me over the election I'm thinking of refusing anyone from Scotland.

What about self employed sole traders with less than 3 years of certified accounts.

Some landlords also "try" to avoid disabled tenants due to the changes to property they can force through such as lowering the kitchen units and bathrooms changed to wet rooms. Unless you clearly get it established (in writing) at the start who pays (tenant or council) when they vacate the landlord could end up paying.

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Definitely NOT!!! Been there and refused it before. This is probably a partner or illegal overstayer of some sort. Whatever you don't want to allow it as you could be an accessory to fraudulent acts and aiding an illegal immigrant.

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I've never had an application from anyone disabled but you are right, its worth adding to the list.

As far as self employed/ sole traders are concerned, I always take rent guarantee insurance (or occasionally a guarantor instead) so I'm less concerned about that group of applicants. They probably wouldn't qualify for RGI anymore than some of the others on my list.

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I suggest follow Cor's advice, and with your polite refusal for application, add that you accept Au Pair as a Guest, for whose actions at the property your tenant has to fully responsible under your AST.

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